Day: May 1, 2020

Coronavirus Live Updates: More States Let Businesses Reopen; Many Students are Postponing College Decisions

michael barbaro

From The New York Times, I’m Michael Barbaro. This is “The Daily.”

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Michigan has been one of the most aggressive states when it comes to taking steps to combat the coronavirus.

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Bans on all gatherings outside a single household, travel to in-state vacation homes, and the use of motorboats —

michael barbaro

Michigan’s restrictions on its citizens movements have been at the center of a national debate about public health versus economic survival.

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Protests in Michigan are growing because the governor, Democrat Gretchen Whitmer, has told us citizens they can’t leave the city and stay in their summer homes.

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Don’t buy paint, don’t buy roses, don’t buy — I mean, she’s got all these crazy things.

michael barbaro

Today: A conversation with the governor who ordered those restrictions and a demonstrator who is protesting them.

It’s

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How Coronavirus Mutates and Spreads



The Coronavirus Genome

The coronavirus is an oily membrane packed with genetic instructions to make millions of copies of itself. The instructions are encoded in 30,000 “letters” of RNA — a, c, g and u — which the infected cell reads and translates into many kinds of virus proteins.





RNA instructions to make the ORF1a protein

Start of coronavirus genome

Start of coronavirus genome

Start of the

coronavirus

genome

Start of the

coronavirus

genome


A New Coronavirus Dec. 26

In December, a cluster of mysterious pneumonia cases appeared around a seafood market in Wuhan, China. In early January, researchers sequenced the first genome of a new coronavirus, which they isolated from a man who worked at the market. That first genome became the baseline for scientists to track the SARS-CoV-2 virus as it spreads around the world.





Genome Wuhan-Hu-1, collected on Dec. 26 from an early patient

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As Georgia Reopens, Virus Study Shows Black Residents May Bear Brunt

As Georgia reopens many businesses over objections from President Trump and others, a new study illustrates the high rates of coronavirus infection among black people in the state.

The report, released Wednesday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said that more than four-fifths of hospitalized coronavirus patients in the study were black. They were not more likely than other groups to die from the disease or to require a ventilator. Still, of the 297 patients in the study whose race and ethnicity were known, 83.2 percent were black.

“That is a very high rate of infections,” said Dr. Wayne A.I. Frederick, a cancer surgeon and the president of Howard University, who was not involved in the C.D.C. report. He said the high percentage of blacks in the study likely reflects the patients’ occupations.

“A lot of it may come from the fact that African-Americans are essential employees in

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Old Drugs May Find a New Purpose: Fighting the Coronavirus

In the early 1950s, psychiatrists began treating schizophrenia with a new drug called chlorpromazine. Seven decades later, the drug is still used as an anti-psychotic.

But now scientists have discovered that the drug, also known as Thorazine, can do something entirely different. It can stop the new coronavirus that causes Covid-19 from invading cells.

Driven by the pandemic’s spread, research teams have been screening thousands of drugs to see if they have this unexpected potential to fight the coronavirus. They’ve tested the drugs on dishes of cells, and a few dozen candidates have made the first cut.

They’re startlingly diverse. Some, like chlorpromazine, have been used for years — not for viral infections, but for conditions including cancer, allergies, arthritis, even irregular menstrual periods. Other drugs have not yet been approved by the Food and Drug Administration, but they have already proven safe in clinical trials. Their track records

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