Day: June 12, 2020

Covid-19 Patient Gets Double Lung Transplant, Offering Hope for Others

A young woman whose lungs were destroyed by the coronavirus received a double lung transplant last week at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago, the hospital reported on Thursday, the first known lung transplant in the United States for Covid-19.

The 10-hour surgery was more difficult and took several hours longer than most lung transplants because inflammation from the disease had left the woman’s lungs “completely plastered to tissue around them, the heart, the chest wall and diaphragm,” said Dr. Ankit Bharat, the chief of thoracic surgery and surgical director of the lung transplant program at Northwestern Medicine, which includes Northwestern Memorial Hospital, in an interview.

He said the patient, a woman in her 20s who had no serious underlying medical conditions, was recovering well: “She’s awake, she’s smiling, she FaceTimed with her family.”

But she has a long way to go. She is still on a ventilator because even though

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Coronavirus Vaccine Tracker – The New York Times








Vaccines not yet

in human trials

Testing safety

and dosage

Large-scale

efficacy tests

Vaccines

approved for use

Vaccines not yet in human trials

Testing safety

and dosage

Large-scale

efficacy tests

Vaccines not yet in human trials

Testing safety

and dosage

Large-scale

efficacy tests


Researchers around the world are developing more than 135 vaccines against the coronavirus. Vaccines typically require years of research and testing before reaching the clinic, but scientists are racing to produce a safe and effective vaccine by next year.





Antibody

produced in

response to a

vaccine

Antibody produced in

response to a vaccine

Antibody produced in

response to a vaccine


Work began in January with the deciphering of the SARS-CoV-2 genome. The first vaccine safety trials in humans started in March, but the road ahead remains uncertain. Some trials will fail, and others may end without a clear result. But a few may succeed in stimulating the

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Black and Latino Churches Offer Prayers, Hope and Coronavirus Testing

Ten days in May. Twenty-four churches around New York City. Nearly 20,000 coronavirus tests.

Over the past few weeks, churches serving communities of color have been transformed overnight into mini-clinics offering free coronavirus tests to all comers. The initiative, a partnership of the churches, Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo’s office and Northwell Health, is an effort to expand testing among black and Hispanic citizens, who have been disproportionately affected by the pandemic.

Black and Latino New Yorkers have succumbed to Covid-19, the illness caused by the coronavirus, at twice the rate of whites, a result of entrenched economic and health disparities, denser housing and a higher risk of exposure on the job.

Participants were asked to preregister by phone, but walk-ins were accommodated so long as they lined up six feet apart and wore masks. Among those who sought testing on a cool, sunny Wednesday in May were two teenage brothers

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How to Get Fit at Home

You want to get fit. But you don’t want to join a health club — it’s too expensive, there’s no gym convenient to you, or maybe you’re just the independent type. Or perhaps you’re already a gym member, but your schedule has been too hectic for you to do some exercise.

That leaves working out at home as an option. But can you get a great workout without leaving the house?

According to Steele, an effective fitness program has five components, all of which you can do at home:

  • A warmup.
  • A cardiovascular (aerobic) workout.
  • Resistance (strength-building) exercises.
  • Flexibility moves.
  • Exercising using an exercise bike.

Warmup

A warmup could be an easy walk outside or on a treadmill, or a slow pace on a stationary bike. For the cardiovascular portion, walk or pedal faster, do step aerobics with a video, or jump rope — whatever you enjoy that gets your … Read More