Covid

A Covid Patient Goes Home After a Rare Double Lung Transplant

The last thing that Mayra Ramirez remembers from the emergency room at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago is calling her family to say she had Covid, was about to be put on a ventilator and needed her mother to make medical decisions for her.

Ms. Ramirez, 28, did not wake up for more than six weeks. And then she learned that on June 5, she had become the first Covid patient in the United States to receive a double-lung transplant.

On Wednesday, she went home from the hospital.

Ms. Ramirez is one of a small but growing number of patients whose lungs have been destroyed by the coronavirus, and whose only hope of survival is a lung transplant.

“I’m pretty sure that if I had been at another center, they would have just ended care and let me die,” she said in an interview on Wednesday.

The surgery is considered

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Trump’s Health Officials Warn More Will Die as Covid Cases Rise

“There’s no downside to wearing a mask,” Admiral Giroir responded. “I’m a pediatric I.C.U. physician. I wore a mask 10 hours a day for many many years.”

Dr. Adams wore a mask during his entire interview on the CBS program “Face the Nation” even though he was being interviewed remotely from Indiana. He said measures like wearing face coverings were “critically important.”

Earlier in the pandemic, Dr. Adams had discouraged people from buying masks, in part so there would be enough for medical workers, and he had said “masks do not work for the general public in preventing them from getting coronavirus.”

On Sunday, when the host of “Face the Nation,” Margaret Brennan, asked if he regretted saying that masks were not effective in keeping the general population healthy, Dr. Adams replied: “Once upon a time, we prescribed cigarettes for asthmatics, and leeches and cocaine and heroin for people as

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Grave Shortages of P.P.E. Gear Flare Again as Covid Cases Surge

Ms. Murray said medical staff members worried that surgical masks offered little protection when treating asymptomatic carriers of the virus. She said she was increasingly seized with anxiety as the hospital filled up with coronavirus patients, some of them sent from local nursing homes, because staff members lacked even basic protective gear and were unable to care for them.

Hospital administrators, she said, won’t even allow employees to wear N95 masks they have purchased with their own money. “We’re nurses — we want to take care of our patients and we want them to be safe,” Ms. Murray said. “But at the end of the day, we want to go home to our families and know that they are safe too.”

A spokeswoman for St. Petersburg General declined to comment on the hospital’s mask policies but said adequate supplies were available to employees who needed them.

Across the country, private

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‘They Want to Kill Me’: Many Covid Patients Have Terrifying Delirium

One moment, scientists in Japan were testing chemicals on her; the next she was telling them, “‘I am an American and I have a right to eat a cheeseburger and drink Coca-Cola,’” she recalled, adding: “I don’t even like cheeseburgers.”

Along with this agitated hyperactive delirium, she experienced internalized hypoactive delirium. In a recovery room after leaving the I.C.U., she’d stare for 10 to 20 seconds when asked basic questions, said Dr. Hageman, adding, “Nothing was quite processing.”

Ms. Victory managed to take a picture of herself with nasal oxygen tubes and a forehead scar, post it on Facebook and write “I’m alive” in Vietnamese so her parents in Vietnam would know she’d survived. But another day, she called her husband, Wess Victory, 15 or 20 times, repeatedly saying, “I give you two hours to come pick me up.”

“It was heartbreaking,” said Mr. Victory, who patiently told her she

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