Cure

A ‘Cure for Heart Disease’? A Single Shot Succeeds in Monkeys

Not only did the system work in 13 monkeys, the researchers reported, but it appeared that every liver cell was edited. After gene editing, the monkeys’ LDL levels dropped by 59 percent within two weeks. The ANGPTL3 gene editing led to a 64 percent decline in triglyceride levels.

One danger of gene editing is the process may result in modification of DNA that scientists are not expecting. “You will never be able to have no off-target effects,” warned Dr. Deepak Srivastava, president of the Gladstone Institutes in San Francisco.

In treating a condition as common as heart disease, he added, even an uncommon side effect can mean many patients are affected. So far, however, the researchers say that they have not seen any inadvertent editing of other genes.

Another question is how long the effect on cholesterol and triglyceride levels will last, Dr. Davidson said. “We hope it will be

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Trump’s Bleach Statements Echo Claims by ‘Miracle Cure’ Quacks

President Trump’s public statements about using disinfectants to potentially treat the coronavirus have put him in the company of pseudoscientists and purveyors of phony elixirs who promote and sell industrial bleach as a “miracle cure” for autism, malaria and a long list of medical conditions.

But some scientists fear Mr. Trump’s remarks could breathe life into a fringe movement that embraces the medicinal powers of a powerful industrial bleach known as chlorine dioxide. Among its adherents are Alan Keyes, the conservative activist and former presidential candidate who has promoted a chlorine dioxide-based product called Miracle Mineral Solution on his online television show.

The impact of Trump’s words “is going to be huge, especially among people who are desperate,” said Myles Power, a British chemist who works to debunk quack medical remedies. “My fear is it will cause widespread harm to people who think that drinking bleach can prevent or cure

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