Hydroxychloroquine

Federal Agency Halts Studies of Hydroxychloroquine, Drug Trump Promoted

The National Institutes of Health said Saturday that it had stopped two clinical trials of hydroxychloroquine, the malaria drug that President Trump promoted to treat and prevent the coronavirus, one because the drug was unlikely to be effective and the other because not enough patients signed up to participate.

The agency halted a trial that had aimed to enroll more than 500 patients after an independent oversight board determined that the drug did not appear to benefit hospitalized patients. The same day, the N.I.H. said it had closed another trial — of hydroxychloroquine and the antibiotic azithromycin — because only about 20 patients had enrolled in the planned study of 2,000 people.

The two trials the N.I.H. shut down represent the latest evidence that hydroxychloroquine has not lived up to its early promise of fighting the coronavirus.

The N.I.H. said Saturday that an independent oversight board that monitors safety met

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New Study Finds Hydroxychloroquine Did Not Prevent Covid-19

About 88 percent had high-risk exposures.

The participants, recruited online, ranged in age from 33 to 50, with a median age of 40. About half were women, and 66 percent of the total were health care workers. They were healthy and had no underlying health problems that would have made hydroxychloroquine dangerous for them. Most of the rest had been exposed at home, to an infected spouse, partner or parent.

Within four days of exposure, the participants were picked at random to receive either hydroxychloroquine or a placebo, and then followed to determine whether they had either laboratory-confirmed Covid-19, or an illness consistent with the virus, during the next 14 days.

The drug or placebos were mailed to them, and they then reported their symptoms online to the researchers, who did not examine them.

Not all the participants could be tested for the virus, because when the study was being

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Scientists Question Major Hydroxychloroquine Study

More than 100 scientists and clinicians have questioned the authenticity of a massive hospital database that was the basis for an influential study published last week that concluded that treating people who have Covid-19 with chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine did not help and might have increased the risk of abnormal heart rhythms and death.

In an open letter to The Lancet’s editor, Richard Horton, and the paper’s authors, the scientists asked the journal to provide details about the provenance of the data and called for the study to be independently validated by the World Health Organization or another institution.

A spokeswoman for Dr. Mandeep R. Mehra, the Harvard professor who was the paper’s lead author, said on Friday that the study’s authors had asked for an independent academic review and audit of their work.

Use of the malaria drugs chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine to prevent and treat Covid-19 has been a focus

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Coronavirus Live Updates: Trump Says He Takes Hydroxychloroquine

Trump says he has been taking hydroxychloroquine, a drug whose effectiveness against the virus is unproven.

President Trump said Monday that he has been taking hydroxychloroquine, an antimalarial drug whose effectiveness against the coronavirus is unproven, for about a week and a half as a preventive measure, saying he had no symptoms of Covid-19.

The drugs can cause dangerous abnormalities in heart rhythm in virus patients, the F.D.A. warned, saying that they should be used only in clinical trials or hospitals where patients can be closely monitored for heart problems.

And on Monday a doctor overseeing a national trial said that he agreed.

“There are no data that pre-exposure prophylaxis is effective to prevent coronavirus,” Dr. David Boulware of the University of Minnesota, who is overseeing a national trial to test whether hydroxychloroquine can prevent infections, said in a statement. “It may be. It may not be. We do not

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