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Coronavirus Vaccine Shows Promising Early Results in China

A vaccine developed in China appears to be safe and may protect people from the new coronavirus, researchers reported on Friday.

The early-stage trial, published in the Lancet, was conducted by researchers at several laboratories and included 108 participants aged 18 to 60. Those who received a single dose of the vaccine produced certain immune cells, called T cells, within two weeks. Antibodies needed for immunity peaked at 28 days after the inoculation.

“This is promising data, but it’s early data,” said Dr. Dan Barouch, director of vaccine research at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, who was not involved in the work. “Over all, I would say this is good news.”

The trial is the first step in testing the vaccine and was intended mainly to verify its safety. Proof of its effectiveness will require trials in thousands, perhaps hundreds of thousands, more people.

A vaccine for

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Moderna Coronavirus Vaccine Trial Shows Promising Early Results

The first coronavirus vaccine to be tested in people appears to be safe and able to stimulate an immune response against the infection, the manufacturer, Moderna, announced on Monday, offering a glint of hope to a world desperate for ways to stop the pandemic.

The preliminary findings, in the first eight people who each received two doses of the experimental vaccine, must now be repeated in far larger tests in hundreds and then thousands of people, to find out if the vaccine can work in the real world. Moderna’s technology, involving genetic material from the virus called mRNA, is relatively new and has yet to produce any approved vaccine.

The promising early news sent Moderna’s stock soaring by more than 25 percent on Monday afternoon and helped drive Wall Street to its best day in six weeks. Stocks were also lifted by statements from the Federal Reserve chair, Jerome H.

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Vaccinations Fall to Alarming Rates, C.D.C. Study Shows

As states across the country relax stay-at-home orders and people return to more normal routines, some researchers worry about a spike in vaccine-preventable diseases in addition to the coronavirus’s spread.

Angela Shen, a research scientist at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the co-author of the study, said the falling rates in Michigan were concerning and quite likely representative of trends throughout the country.

“Now, you’re not just dealing with Covid,” she said, referring to Covid-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus. “Now you’re contending with common vaccine-preventable diseases.”

Over the past two months, the risk of infection for diseases

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App Shows Promise in Tracking New Coronavirus Cases, Study Finds

In the absence of widespread on-demand testing, public health officials across the world have been struggling to track the spread of the coronavirus pandemic in real time. A team of scientists in the United States and the United Kingdom says a crowdsourcing smartphone app may be the answer to that quandary.

In a study published Monday in the journal Nature Medicine, researchers found that an app that allows people to check off symptoms they are experiencing was remarkably effective in predicting coronavirus infections among the 2.5 million people who were using it between March 24 and April 21.

The study, which tracked people in the United States, the United Kingdom and Sweden, found that the loss of taste and smell was the No. 1 predictor of whether a person was going to get sick with Covid-19, the illness caused by the coronavirus, followed by extreme fatigue and acute muscle pain.

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