York

Coronavirus Vaccine Tracker – The New York Times








Vaccines not yet

in human trials

Testing safety

and dosage

Large-scale

efficacy tests

Vaccines

approved for use

Vaccines not yet in human trials

Testing safety

and dosage

Large-scale

efficacy tests

Vaccines not yet in human trials

Testing safety

and dosage

Large-scale

efficacy tests


Researchers around the world are developing more than 135 vaccines against the coronavirus. Vaccines typically require years of research and testing before reaching the clinic, but scientists are racing to produce a safe and effective vaccine by next year.





Antibody

produced in

response to a

vaccine

Antibody produced in

response to a vaccine

Antibody produced in

response to a vaccine


Work began in January with the deciphering of the SARS-CoV-2 genome. The first vaccine safety trials in humans started in March, but the road ahead remains uncertain. Some trials will fail, and others may end without a clear result. But a few may succeed in stimulating the

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Live Coronavirus Updates – The New York Times

“This is dispatch. How can I help you?” “Patient is Covid-19 positive.” “I had conversations with people from when this was first starting. And you know, I was telling people like, ‘I think it’s just the flu. I think everyone’s full of shit,’ you know, kind of like, all right, like, no big deal, you know? Like, it’s another thing.” “Code 1 for possible Covid.” “Well, I’ve been in E.M.S. over 20 years. I knew coming into it that there would be tragedies, there’s a possibility of an epidemic, pandemic. But I honestly never thought we would see days like this.” “Call volume is much higher. A lot of people are a lot more sick than we normally deal with. The hardest role is talking people through these emergencies. We’re kind of making these big decisions now. Are we staying home and potentially letting them die at home? Or are

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Hospitals Move Into Next Phase as New York Passes Viral Peak

Across New York City, hospitals have moved into a new phase in their battle against the coronavirus.

In the city that was hit hardest by the pandemic in the United States, the number of new patients and the daily death toll have dropped sharply. Many of the refrigerated trucks filled with bodies are gone. Doctors no longer routinely plead for help in makeshift protective gear. The emergency room at Elmhurst Hospital in Queens, once overwhelmed, treats barely a third of the people it did before the outbreak.

“It’s like someone turned off the hose,” said Dr. Eric Wei, an emergency medicine physician and senior vice president of quality for NYC Health & Hospitals, the public health care system, referring to patient numbers in recent weeks.

“There’s a huge psychological desire to be like, ‘Whew, we’re through the worst of it,’” he said, but cautioned, “It’s a challenge to fight that

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How Pandemics End – The New York Times

When will the Covid-19 pandemic end? And how?

According to historians, pandemics typically have two types of endings: the medical, which occurs when the incidence and death rates plummet, and the social, when the epidemic of fear about the disease wanes.

“When people ask, ‘When will this end?,’ they are asking about the social ending,” said Dr. Jeremy Greene, a historian of medicine at Johns Hopkins.

In other words, an end can occur not because a disease has been vanquished but because people grow tired of panic mode and learn to live with a disease. Allan Brandt, a Harvard historian, said something similar was happening with Covid-19: “As we have seen in the debate about opening the economy, many questions about the so-called end are determined not by medical and public health data but by sociopolitical processes.”

Endings “are very, very messy,” said Dora Vargha, a historian at the University

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